Assisting the Dead: An Opportunity of a Lifetime

Assisting the Dead: An Opportunity of a Lifetime

by Fred Rible

It had been over nine years since I’d taken my last program at TMI, so I had no idea how my Lifeline program experience would be in July of 2007. I was pleased to be able to jump right in and get started with the help of my trainers, Karen and Paul.

Important to me was to be able to confirm that what I was doing was actual retrievals and not my imagination. The “proof” came Tuesday afternoon. I had just completed two retrievals during an exercise. The first was a young girl, of about four to five years, who was crying for her mommy. The picture that formed in my mind indicated that she had succumbed to carbon monoxide poisoning while sleeping in a room with a faulty heater. I was able to calm her and told her I was there to take her to mommy and led her up to the light, reaching F-27 and the loving arms of relatives.

This young man, an Army specialist ... had been ambushed and he’d taken a bullet to the head by a sniper.

Upon completing this task, I immediately intuited that someone else was in distress and needed my assistance. I followed the energy and on arrival found myself in Iraq at the scene of a recent sniper shooting. This young man, an Army specialist, was extremely confused and I was able to gather that his squad had been ambushed and he’d taken a bullet to the head by a sniper. I learned his name was Rich, from Abilene, Texas. His unit was based at Fort Hood, Texas, prior to his deployment. I told him I was in the Navy and had been sent to evacuate him from the area, to which he readily assented. I grabbed his arm and led him upward towards the light. As we ascended he disappeared from my grasp into the belief system territories of F-24 to F-26 (two of the deep-state “Focus Levels” mapped by Robert A. Monroe).

While recording my experiences I wondered about the second retrieval and how I was summoned to assist the young Army specialist. Was the experience real or imagined? Immediately afterward, we assembled to debrief the exercise. In our group was an experienced trainer, Chris Lentz, who was taking Lifeline so he could become a Lifeline trainer. Chris debriefed prior to me and said that he had first encountered an Army man in Iraq who’d been shot and because he knew I’d been in the Navy, summoned me to assist this young man in his transition!

[Performing retrievals] has helped to heal my grief from the loss of my son in such a profound way—by bringing love and peace to others and, in return, ... I receive ... love and peace in my own heart.

Since July 2007, I have performed several retrievals on my own. As an empath, I can readily tune into the individual’s emotions at and around the time of death. Three of note were included in a session of over two hours in which I assisted the victims of the Fukushima disaster, then a professional ballplayer who’d committed suicide due to traumatic brain injury, and last, a local teen who’d been brutally raped and murdered while out jogging. In the last instance, while she seemed to have accepted her fate, she expressed her deep concern for her grieving dad who was the first to discover her missing.

By October 2015 when I took Lifeline for the second time, I’d become rather adept at setting my intention and following through with helping lost souls. My most profound session was when I enlisted the help of my deceased son, Jason, to locate children who might be in need of our services. As I reached F-23 I found myself at the site of the South Korea Ferry, Sewol, which was sinking with over 200 secondary school students who perished on board. Many of them were inside huddled in fear. Jason coaxed several out and we led a large group to the reception area at F-27, into the arms of loved ones who greeted them and filled me with love and gratitude. I also felt the immense grief expressed by parents and family of these children and went to work to heal their grief.

Through my experiences, I’ve come to appreciate the significance of soul rescue and retrieval work and my calling to provide assistance to those in need. The Lifeline program provides the framework and tools to perform retrievals but it is up to the individual to find what works best. For me, it has helped to heal my grief from the loss of my son in such a profound way—by bringing love and peace to others and, in return, at the deepest level, I receive over and over again that gift of love and peace in my own heart.


F_Rible.jpgFred Rible, a retired Navy Supply Corps Captain, serves The Monroe Institute on multiple fronts. He is currently a member of TMI’s Board of Directors, a Residential Trainer, an Outreach Trainer, a member of the Professional Division, and a member of the Local Chapter Network.

Fred was introduced to rescue and retrieval work through the Lifeline program, designed by Robert Monroe for that purpose, and continues to assist those who have left their physical bodies but need help moving on. He says, “I truly honor the path that each of us has chosen in life to gain perspective and understanding of our eternal selves.”

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