The Director’s Chair: April 2019—Scott Taylor

The Director’s Chair: April 2019—Scott Taylor

TMI Welcomes Scott Taylor

Scott Taylor 2019.jpgAs of this writing, it has been almost five weeks since I took my place in the “Director’s Chair” here at TMI. That means I have about sixty-five days remaining in my first one hundred days. My plan is to take these first hundred days to observe, to listen—intently—to absorb, before taking substantive action. I want to hear from our staff, trainers, our board members, volunteers, participants, and stakeholders of all flavors. There are countless moving parts to TMI that need to be respected and heard.

The lens through which I perceive the Institute is that of a veteran program trainer. It’s been a good, clear lens for thirty-four years. Now, I need to look at the Institute through multiple lenses, so—I will do that.

As many of you know, my predecessor Nancy “Scooter” McMoneagle is, among her many talents, a professional astrologer. Of course, she used that knowledge to TMI’s advantage during her tenure. When settling on the date for our exchange, Scooter recommended March 4th so that I would be in place before Mercury went retrograde on the 5th.

My own retirement as a professor of small business management occurred on March 1st. Immediately, I hit the road to drive 1,152 miles from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to my new home in Virginia. What a journey that was! And a perfect metaphor for this immense and exciting life change.

I left the frozen north during a blizzard. Continuing east, I was struck by the awesome beauty of the USA. Snow gave way to endless farmland throughout the flat terrain of Illinois and Indiana. On I drove into the gorgeous rolling hills of Ohio. I was unprepared for the utter magnificence of West Virginia. Driving into the Blue Ridge Mountains, I watched as clouds filled and danced through the ridges and valleys. It was breathtaking. And now it was mine. I arrived at TMI on a Sunday after three days on the road.

That night I twisted my ankle. It was the Universe telling me, “Don’t go so fast. Learn what you need to learn.” By the time my ankle is fully healed, I’ll have a better perspective on right action as pertains to my role with TMI. It’s important to recognize milestones, to honor the steps, the skills. With it comes personal responsibility.

Meanwhile, Mercury retrograde has shown its teeth. Shortly after I stepped into my new role, the air-conditioning unit up at the Roberts Mountain Retreat center died, a water heater at the Nancy Penn Center went belly up, and the icemaker experienced a permanent out-of-body and flooded the kitchen. So, okay, maybe I need to take SOME action before the one-hundred-day mark.

To our brightest future,

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Scott Taylor, EdD
President & Executive Director

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