Suddenly Psychic: A Skeptic’s Journey

Suddenly Psychic: A Skeptic’s Journey

Written by Maureen Caudill
Reviewed by Matthew Fike, PhD
Focus | Summer/Fall 2007

Whereas Dean Radin’s Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality (reviewed in the winter/spring 2007 TMI Focus) attempts to explain the scientific basis of psi to skeptics, this issue’s selected book, Maureen Caudill’s Suddenly Psychic: A Skeptic’s Journey, seeks a dual audience—those who want a well-written tale of a Monroe-related psychic journey and those who are struggling to overcome skepticism about their own psychic ability. What links the two authors together, though, is an interest in the marriage of science and psi, as well as the intention to promote existing research in order to legitimize belief in psi. Radin synthesizes many studies to make a case that is light on anecdote; Caudill summarizes others’ syntheses—including parts of Radin’s earlier book, The Conscious Universe —to convey scientific explanations for her own wide-ranging and highly anecdotal psychic experiences. It is hard to imagine a person better suited for this task than Maureen Caudill, who is well versed in both science and psi. With a bachelor’s degree in physics, a master’s degree in computer science, and three previous books in the latter, she initially embraced the scientific materialist’s credo that there is nothing beyond physical reality, until TMI courses motivated her “to find a way to reconcile my strange experiences with the science I was trained to believe in and respect.” Suddenly Psychic is the result of her efforts.

A typical chapter begins with one of Caudill’s experiences, discusses the relevant science, and then returns to the experience with a greater sense of understanding. The author’s experiences involve remote viewing, remote healing, telepathy, communication with the dead, pet communication, spoon bending, multiple lifetimes, soul retrieval, spirit guides, assistance with a good friend’s transition to the spirit plane, and precognition of her own death (understandably the most cryptic part of the book). Readers of Suddenly Psychic may well encounter certain other phenomena for the first time. These include a kundalini awakening, interdimensional chutes, the use of healing energy to change the past, Focus 49 (“the Eye of God”), and Focus 253 (a Golden Wall, “the Thought that Sources all universes”).

Beyond any doubt, the most interesting chapter—and the one that best shows that the benefits of the Monroe system continue to unfold—is Chapter 10, “Playing Fetch,” in which Caudill and her spirit guide, “Click,” travel to Mars where she retrieves the soul of Europe’s Beagle 2 lander. She takes the puppy-like machine spirit to Focus 13 (previously unreported by anyone at the Institute), a kind of Focus 27 for machines. When she later finds the Beagle unhappy there, she opens a “pipeline” for heart energy from Focus 18 (healing herself in the process) and delivers the lander to the animal portion of Focus 27. Her cat, Sammy, who passes away earlier in the book, will now help the Beagle prepare for an incarnation as an animal.

According to Caudill, machines can develop a soul by becoming sufficiently complex, much as a brain becomes a mind; however, machine souls are “rudimentary” because they possess only “situational awareness” and “self-awareness.” What confines them to Focus 13 and makes them “incomplete and partial” is their inability to love. Still, Caudill suggests that the first intelligent androids may emerge by 2015, along with wide-ranging ethical dilemmas. Indeed, the retrieval of the Beagle suggests that such issues may already be upon us.

An expert in artificial intelligence, Caudill is at her best in the Beagle chapter, but her melding of psychic experience and science is generally sure-footed throughout the book. The theories discussed include morphogenetic fields (spoon bending), a multidimensional universe (altered states), and time travel (changing the past). Several other explanations, however, gradually emerge as leading contenders to explain psi. The first is holograms: if every part of the universe contains a copy of the whole, then connecting to a nearby piece of it enables one to perceive the far reaches of space and time. A second possibility is that quantum entanglement (Radin’s thesis) accounts for the human mind’s ability to perceive and transmit information over great distances. Caudill sums up her favored theory as follows: “If Laszlo’s Akashic field theory is correct, paranormal abilities, remote viewing, telepathy, and accessing information outside of local space and local time merely becomes [sic] a process of ‘reading’ or ‘interpreting’ the holographic Akashic information field in our local corner of the universe. This also implies that anyone has the potential to ‘be psychic’ because that same information is local to all of us.”

Suddenly Psychic concludes with advice on living well, which the book’s last sentence summarizes: “Live in love.” There ends the author’s account of her own adventures in science and psi, but the book continues with a number of things that readers will want to pore over. The “Afterword,” addressed to those who want to develop their psychic ability, stresses paying attention to subtle signs, surrounding oneself with supportive people, and practicing regularly. The appendices address energy bodies, the human aura, chakras, chi, karma, and “TMI’s cosmology” of forty-nine Focus levels. A helpful glossary follows, and a first-rate bibliography, helpfully divided by subject, caps off the volume. In conclusion, whether one is looking for a fascinating account that rivals anything in the Monroe literature, a primer in cutting-edge science, or merely an explanation of Hemi-Sync® (Caudill’s may be the clearest ever written), Suddenly Psychic —an engaging and lucid account that discusses and validates personal experience in light of scientific theory—will satisfy and comes highly recommended.

Matthew Fike is an associate professor of English at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C.


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© 2007 by The Monroe Institute

Book TitleSuddenly Psychic: A Skeptic’s Journey
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Written by Maureen Caudill
Reviewed by Matthew Fike, PhD
Focus | Summer/Fall 2007

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