Think Logically, Live Intuitively: Seeking the Balance

Think Logically, Live Intuitively: Seeking the Balance

Written by J. R. Madaus
Reviewed by Matthew Fike, PhD
Focus | Summer/Fall 2006

 
 

Toward the end of his new book, Richard Madaus seems to direct a remark to the reader: “How one reads a book can reveal a great deal about how one approaches life itself.” In other words, the part represents the whole, and an overall perspective in turn influences the part. But the more important point is that the author’s own approaches to life are in a similar reciprocal relationship with how he writes a book about the reading experience. Think Logically, Live Intuitively comments on complementary acts of reading: the author’s interpretation of his courses at The Monroe Institute, the School for Enlightenment and Healing in San Diego, and the Institute of HeartMath in Boulder; and his synthesis of voluminous reading in cutting-edge scientific literature (the seeker will find much of interest in the “Recommended Reading”). As a psychic experiencer who is also an information specialist (“a librarian turned computer nerd”), Madaus examines the implications of “psi” (a term he prefers to “paranormal”) in ways that help to reconcile mysticism with science for an audience of nonspecialists.

Madaus’s experiences at TMI—told in present tense for immediacy—are the main highlight of Think Logically, Live Intuitively. He participated in the GATEWAY VOYAGE® in April 1995, just one month after Robert Monroe’s transition, so the book contains no new anecdotes about the man himself. But it does offer an array of fabulous psychic experiences. Madaus writes, “The TMI [GATEWAY] program had sent me far out into the universe. [GUIDELINES®] has now taken me deep within the small.” At GATEWAY he frequently went out-of-body, expanded his consciousness to embrace the universe, and entered the Light as do those who have near-death experiences. At GUIDELINES, he explored from the point of view of a single cell in his own lung, had a memorable PREP session in the isolation booth, and communicated with two Guides—a Native American male named Gray Wolf (a.k.a. Ralph) and “a lovely, gossamer-clad, ethereal creature” named Elizabeth who claimed to inhabit his heart chakra. At LIFELINE™, the author “encountered the great teachers of various religions,” and later he “witnessed the attendance of the departed at their own funerals and participated in the transition process with others.” These are fascinating statements, and the reader will wish that Madaus had provided specifics, but the book does include a detailed account of a dramatic soul retrieval that occurred during a post-LIFELINE “craniosacral therapy session with a massage therapist” (like the “Patrick Tape,” the account involves retrieving the male victim of a mishap at sea who did not realize that he was already dead).

Regarding his Guides’ gender, Madaus’s point in his journal—“This is all a symbol for the masculine and feminine aspects of guidance”—deserves amplification. Gray Wolf and Elizabeth are what Carl Jung (mentioned elsewhere in the book) would call an animus/anima pair or syzygy, and they parallel the sort of balance that TMI seeks to foster by having a man and a woman facilitate each residential course. More to the point, Think Logically, Live Intuitively regularly touches on the way in which a male’s psychic exploration puts him in touch with his feminine aspect. For Madaus, the experience of the Goddess in his heart chakra led to greater appreciation of love and enhanced his already-blissful relationship with his wife of thirty years.

Besides recounting his TMI experiences, Madaus synthesizes years of reading in scientific literature, and among various good reasons to read Think Logically, Live Intuitively is the fact that this review can only mention a few of the high points. A continuum spanning the physical, the psychoenergetic or intellect, and the transcendental or quantum provides a context for understanding that the nonphysical can promote physical healing. Moreover, if the energy fields of mind and body “are significantly intertwined,” then doctors should broaden their perspective, and psi should be used in medical diagnosis.  He does, however, devote significant attention to therapeutic touch (he is a healer himself), and his fascinating experiences at the School for Enlightenment and Healing—one of the book’s highlights—are in harmony with the discussion of a holographic model in which “consciousness manifests as reality.”

In synthesizing others’ logical approaches to intuitive experience, Madaus, like Joseph M. Felser in The Way Back To Paradise (reviewed in the winter/spring 2005 TMI Focus), proposes a balance between an array of seemingly conflicting elements. On the one hand, Western science emphasizes a conscious, objective, skeptical, brain-centered, and ego-driven approach to physical phenomena perceived only by the five senses. On the other, Eastern mysticism manifests openness to nonlocal phenomena, the spirit world, and expanded awareness. Madaus asserts a “multiple-answer approach” in which such seemingly contradictory world views can both be true at the same time, and this balance or “‘wholebrain’ approach” becomes a “dance” in which we can engage on a personal level if we will experience before we analyze. Given such stated inclusiveness, it is disappointing that the last page lapses into binary opposition between following “life scripts” and embracing “totality.” Overall, though, the book advocates complementarity, not mutual exclusivity.

Madaus concludes by answering the question that inspired him to write Think Logically, Live Intuitively: what advantage or benefit does psi offer? His answer: “You can benefit from inner exploration by gaining your total freedom and assuming your true identity.” This “true identity”—rendered elsewhere as “Total Self,” “true self,” “deep self,” and what Jane Roberts calls “source self”—includes physical, nonlocal, and quantum parts of our being. Affirmation of the Total Self involves appreciating the connectedness of all persons, overcoming the nexus of ego-intellect, and taking responsibility for the effects that our energy fields have on others and the world. In Madaus’s view, realizing this totality “may be the beginning of true wisdom and a whole new level of humility.”

Matthew Fike is an associate professor of English at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C.


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Book TitleThink Logically, Live Intuitively: Seeking the Balance
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Written by J. R. Madaus
Reviewed by Matthew Fike, PhD
Focus | Summer/Fall 2006

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